Ada Yonath

11. 3. 2017

Go after your curiosity. You need to have more curiosity. Even more curiosity. But it’s not enough to be curious. You have to have passion. Says Professor Ada E. Yonath. She comes from a poor family, but eventually made her way to the highest levels of science. She studies ribosomes – factories inside cells that translate our genetic information and produce proteins. Without them, life as we know it wouldn’t exist. Few people believed her when she was starting her research – most colleagues tended to ridicule her. But she succeeded – and her research is important among other things for the development of antibiotics. Which is also why she received the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

English version

English version

Ada Yonath, Nobel Prize in Chemistry laureate

Original versions


Research of James Kakalios

20. 5. 2017

Research of James Kakalios

Research of James Kakalios

Research of James Kakalios

Peter Sinclair, deputy site manager of La Silla observatory

EN interview: P. Sinclair

EN interview: P. Sinclair

Elyar Sedaghati, ESO fellow

EN interview: E. Sedaghati

EN interview: E. Sedaghati

Thomas Rivinius, instrument scientist, VLTI

EN interview: T. Rivinius

EN interview: T. Rivinius

Emanuela Pompei, staff astronomer, VLT

EN interview: E. Pompei

EN interview: E. Pompei

Francisco Montenegro, head of science operations, APEX

EN interview: F. Montenegro

EN interview: F. Montenegro

Andreas Kaufer, director of La Silla-Paranal observatory

EN interview: A. Kaufer

EN interview: A. Kaufer

Antonio Helles, ALMA astronomer

EN interview: A. Helles

EN interview: A. Helles

Interview with Fernando Comerón, ESO representative in Chile

EN interview: F: Comerón

EN interview: F: Comerón

Interview with Xavier Barcons, director of ESO

EN interview: X. Barcons

EN interview: X. Barcons