Yoshinori Ohsumi, Nobel Prize in Physiology or medicine laureate

25. 11. 2017

A cleanup in the cell without which we wouldn't survive. That's autophagy - a process in which a cell gets ris of it's damaged or unnecessary parts and which seems to be also crucial in the fight against certain diseases such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease, diabetes or cancer. Autophagy was described by professor Yoshinori Ohsumi and for this he received the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or medicine - the world's most prestigious science award, yet he himself says his first big scientific success came when he was already 43 years old.

English version

English version

Yoshinori Ohsumi, Nobel Prize in Physiology or medicine laureate

Original versions


Research of James Kakalios

20. 5. 2017

Research of James Kakalios

Research of James Kakalios

Research of James Kakalios

Peter Sinclair, deputy site manager of La Silla observatory

EN interview: P. Sinclair

EN interview: P. Sinclair

Elyar Sedaghati, ESO fellow

EN interview: E. Sedaghati

EN interview: E. Sedaghati

Thomas Rivinius, instrument scientist, VLTI

EN interview: T. Rivinius

EN interview: T. Rivinius

Emanuela Pompei, staff astronomer, VLT

EN interview: E. Pompei

EN interview: E. Pompei

Francisco Montenegro, head of science operations, APEX

EN interview: F. Montenegro

EN interview: F. Montenegro

Andreas Kaufer, director of La Silla-Paranal observatory

EN interview: A. Kaufer

EN interview: A. Kaufer

Antonio Helles, ALMA astronomer

EN interview: A. Helles

EN interview: A. Helles

Interview with Fernando Comerón, ESO representative in Chile

EN interview: F: Comerón

EN interview: F: Comerón

Interview with Xavier Barcons, director of ESO

EN interview: X. Barcons

EN interview: X. Barcons