Eric Betzig, Nobel Prize in Chemistry laureate

26. 11. 2016

He says he had two mid-life crisis. The first one when he got an idea and the second one when he implemented it. Today he is Nobel Prize laureate - professor Eric Betzig came up with a method that makes is possible to watch throught optical microscopes things that are only few nanometers big. One nanometer equals one bilionth of a meter. Scientist can now for example see proteins responsible for development of Alzheimer’s or Parkinson‘s disease. He was also able to surpass his own recognised research. He recieved the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and yet he says "I certainly don‘t know any chemistry".

English version

English version

Eric Betzig, inventor, Nobel Prize in Chemistry laureate

Original versions


Research of James Kakalios

20. 5. 2017

Research of James Kakalios

Research of James Kakalios

Research of James Kakalios

Peter Sinclair, deputy site manager of La Silla observatory

EN interview: P. Sinclair

EN interview: P. Sinclair

Elyar Sedaghati, ESO fellow

EN interview: E. Sedaghati

EN interview: E. Sedaghati

Thomas Rivinius, instrument scientist, VLTI

EN interview: T. Rivinius

EN interview: T. Rivinius

Emanuela Pompei, staff astronomer, VLT

EN interview: E. Pompei

EN interview: E. Pompei

Francisco Montenegro, head of science operations, APEX

EN interview: F. Montenegro

EN interview: F. Montenegro

Andreas Kaufer, director of La Silla-Paranal observatory

EN interview: A. Kaufer

EN interview: A. Kaufer

Antonio Helles, ALMA astronomer

EN interview: A. Helles

EN interview: A. Helles

Interview with Fernando Comerón, ESO representative in Chile

EN interview: F: Comerón

EN interview: F: Comerón

Interview with Xavier Barcons, director of ESO

EN interview: X. Barcons

EN interview: X. Barcons