Steve Hughes

7. 3. 2015

In his opinion, the current education system is not perfect: children memorize dates or lists of literary works, receive information in a passive way and have very little room for creativity and activity. This and many other traditional teaching methods do not allow children to utilize all their potential. Steve Hughes, the director of the Center for Research on Developmental Education and the former president of the US Academy of Pediatric Neuropsychology, uses modern neuroscience insights and searches for ways of improving the education of even the youngest children. Do the innovative trends, such as Montessori or Waldorf, provide a solution? Who prefers the traditional education system and who does not? And what about children with different disorders, such as an ADHD? Could they be considered “normal” in a different education system?

English version

English version

Original versions


Research of James Kakalios

20. 5. 2017

Research of James Kakalios

Research of James Kakalios

Research of James Kakalios

Peter Sinclair, deputy site manager of La Silla observatory

EN interview: P. Sinclair

EN interview: P. Sinclair

Elyar Sedaghati, ESO fellow

EN interview: E. Sedaghati

EN interview: E. Sedaghati

Thomas Rivinius, instrument scientist, VLTI

EN interview: T. Rivinius

EN interview: T. Rivinius

Emanuela Pompei, staff astronomer, VLT

EN interview: E. Pompei

EN interview: E. Pompei

Francisco Montenegro, head of science operations, APEX

EN interview: F. Montenegro

EN interview: F. Montenegro

Andreas Kaufer, director of La Silla-Paranal observatory

EN interview: A. Kaufer

EN interview: A. Kaufer

Antonio Helles, ALMA astronomer

EN interview: A. Helles

EN interview: A. Helles

Interview with Fernando Comerón, ESO representative in Chile

EN interview: F: Comerón

EN interview: F: Comerón

Interview with Xavier Barcons, director of ESO

EN interview: X. Barcons

EN interview: X. Barcons